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Showing posts from May, 2018

Five Months Old

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A quick thank you to everybody who has popped by to read my inane drivel / look at the pictures. Thank you too for the kind comments here, on forums and via e-mail. Much appreciated.


Here's a  selfie of me dictating this post to my blog assistant.

This blog was meant to be a way of organising my thoughts and ideas, with the bonus that anyone else interested could share in my research / thoughts. So far in it's  first five months just shy of 5000 page views, with two posts clocking up over 200 views each: Naseby Windmill, and Parliamentarian Foot (which staggeringly is only 8 days old). So I'm guessing one or two of you share my interest.

Royalist Foot

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Yet another of my eye candy posts, consider it task avoidance - I'd rather post pretty pictures on the blog than plaster a wall in the kitchen.

My rationale for my regiments of foot can be found here.

Here are the first six regiments of foot, repressed common men press ganged into fighting for an unjust monarch.

Lord Hopton's Regiment Raised in Bristol in 1643, notable engagements at First and Second Newbury, Cheriton and Cropredy Bridge.


Colonel John Talbot's Regiment
Probably formed from troops released by the Cessation in Ireland; notable engagements were Second Newbury, Cheriton and Cropredy Bridge.


Sir Charles Gerard's Regiment
Raised as part of the Earl of Derby’s forces in Lancashire, they then served with the Oxford Army. Notable engagements include the siege of Manchester, Edgehill, and First Newbury.


Sir Henry Bard's Regiment
Raised in Northumberland in 1643, then served with the Oxford Army. The regiment was later reformed into two regiments: Pinchbeck's…

Parliamentarian Cavalry

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Here are my Parliamentarian cavalry for your delectation.  There was a previous Parliamentarian  Cavalry post which has been retitled 'Regiments of Horse". This post is pure eye candy, the RoH post now documents my rationale for making my cavalry units the way I have.

Major General Richard Browne's Regiment

Raised in London for the First Civil war, not much is known about them other than they were garrisoned in Abingdon.

Colonel Charles Copley's Regiment

Part of Fairfax’s Northern Association they participated at Adwalton Moor, Siege of York, and Marston Moor. Sir William Waller's Regiment
The list of engagements that this regiment took part in is considerable, highlights include: Edgehill, Roundway Down, Cheriton, Cropredy, Basing House and Second Newbury before being disbanded in 1645. Colonel John Lambert's Regiment


Another regiment that was part of Fairfax’s Northern Association. Participated in Hull, Adwalton Moor, Nantwich, Selby, Siege of York, Marston Moor, a…

Parliamentarian Foot

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Another in the latest outbreak of eye candy posts.

My rationale for my regiments of foot can be found here.

Here are the first six regiments of foot, parading in all their finest.

Earl of Essex's Regiment Raised in 1642 for Edgehill, they also took part in both battles of Newbury before being Disbanded and drafted into  the General's Regiment of the New Model Army in 1645. They wore orange tawney coats from September 1642 until re-clothed in an unknown colour in August 1643. Colonel Edward Aldrich's Regiment Regiment of foot of Essex’s Army raised by Lord Saye and Sele but led by Meldrum until he was sent North and replaced by Aldrich. Entered the New Model Army under Colonel Lloyd . Took part at Edgehill, Newark, Lostwithiel and Second Newbury. 

Colonel Charles Fairfax's Regiment Fought in the Second and Third Civil Wars, garrisoning in Scotland during the 1650s.

Lord Robarte's Regiment Part of Essex's army, they fought at Edgehill, Brentford, First Newbury, Lost…

Regiments of Horse

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Edit: regular readers will be thinking I've already read this, wasn't this originally a Parliamentarian specific post? It was, but I have decided that it is more of an overview of my rationale behind my regiments of horse. The Parliamentarian units will be documented more thoroughly in a new post, similar to the Royalist cavalry post.

I must confess to having employed a bit of artistic licence with my cavalry units; not as bad as the flouncy cavaliers, and rugby shirt wearing puritans of the 1970 Cromwell film, but enough to have a button counter seeking therapy, or a quiet room in which to rock.

For some reason, known only to my inner self my Parliamentarian cavalry all wear helmets, and my Royalists wear hats. Tosh I know, but that is how I have organised them.

I've gone for a random mix of sword and pistol wielding figures, from the Peter Pig range of course. I've chosen units of sixteen riders, thirteen troopers, a cornet, a trumpeter and an officer. Based in group…

Partisan Bias

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Regular readers may have noticed a little bit of partisan bias creeping into posts.

There is some historical basis for this bias.


Meet my great (× lots) uncle. Sir Humphrey Chetham, High Sheriff of Lancashire and Parliament's General Treasurer of Lancashire.

As he approached his death he feared the state would take his wealth, so set up a bluecoats school (now a posh music school), a library and a hospital.

Parliamentarian Command

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Here's Parliament's command. Painting by Alan Tuckey, basing by me.

Cromwell, and cornet (with his cavalry regiment standard rather than his Lord Protector's standard).


Parliament's second in command, identified by having a dog. A proper dog, not a poodle. Haven't decided who it represents yet.


Another as yet unidentified general

This is a Matchlock general, paint job is one of mine. Has a look of Black Tom about him. Might rebase him with the dog. His sash looks a bit untidy ''blown up' so he might get a minor repaint too.


Finally a brimfire and treacle preacher.

Royalist Command

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Painting by Alan Tuckey (with one exception), basing by me.

His Majesty, Charles I.


Prince Rupert of the Rhine and Boye. Poodles - not really a 'manly dog' are they? And who were they trying to kid calling it a war poodle?


As yet unnamed generals


This one is from Matchlock, and is one of my paint jobs.


And finally a priest, looking suspiciously sympathetic to the Pope and the Church of Rome.


Dragoons: Complete

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I make no bones about it, this is an eye candy post. Regular readers will be familiar with my unhappiness with my dragoon regiments due to lack of command stands (see here), well here they are completed. I am pretty pleased with the standard bearers - I was a bit worried about them looking too 'heavy' (they are after all standard bearers from the cavalry command packs), thankfully a 'paint conversion' hid the cuirass pretty well. No fiddly filing required. All in all, I think the command stands work really well.


Figures painted by Alan Tuckey, basing by me.

I decided that there should be a one man one horse ratio for the regiments. Really shows how many men are required to hold the horses, and the actual footprint of the unit on the battlefield.

First up are the Parliamentarians: Earl of Manchester (with a  conjectural guidon, the green colour is taken from Manchester's regiment of horse standard),


and Colonel Wardlaw's Regiment - John Barnes's troop.


Now t…

Royalist Cavalry

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Again, another eye candy post. The rationale behind my cavalry regiment composition can be found here.

Figures painted by Alan Tuckey, basing by me.

First four regiments of horse:

Prince Rupert's Regiment


If Rupert was there it is fair to assume his regiment of horse were there too.Powick Bridge, Edgehill, Bristol, First Newbury, Newark, Stockport*, Bolton Liverpool, Marston Moor, Naseby, besieged at Bristol and Oxford, to name but a few highlights. Sir Gervase Lucas's Regiment

Part of the garrison of Belvoir Castle, venturing out for the odd skirmish and the Battle of Newark. Earl of Caernarvon's Regiment
Part of the King’s Oxford Army, they served at Edgehill, Roundway Down, Lansdown, First Newbury (where the Earl was killed), Cheriton, Cropredy and Second Newbury. After Caernarvon’s death they became Colonel Richard Neville’s Regiment of Horse Sir Charles Gerard's Regiment

Served in the Oxford Army taking part in a number of minor battles and skirmishes, notable highlight…

Baggage and Limbers

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As part of my pre-Salute challenge I painted up some more limbers, and a couple more carts for the baggage train, but couldn't finish them due to their drovers being part of a pre-order which was to be collected at Salute.

Horseholders have now been painted, and basing completed and flocked. Particularly pleased with the Gale Force 9 spring undergrowth, adds a nice textural difference to the static grass.

First up the baggage train. Nominally labelled as Parliamentarian or Royalist, but with no visible identifiers, so can be used for either side. These are from Museum Miniatures.



Here's the limbers, from the Naismith range.


And finally a couple of A&M (Donnington Miniatures) carts, that I picked up at Salute. They look nice but are awful to assemble.



I really think that my baggage trains are now complete. Although there are a couple of horseholders in my spares box...


Army Composition

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If you look at orders of battle from the wars, you will notice that there is almost a straight 50/50 split in force numbers between foot and horse.


Looking at my Parliamentarian and Royalist armies I have adjusted them to try and represent this 50/50 split, although my division is by unit numbers rather than an actual 50/50 figure split.
*Update: due to a reorganisation of a cupboard some space was created, which for purposes of symmetry and neatness required filling. So some more Sally 4th boxes were ordered, and new regiments were raised.

Currently each army consists of the following(not all painted yet): 15 regiments of foot (34 figures each, 510 total)3 regiments of firelocks/commanded shot (24 figures each, 72 total)18 regiments of horse (16 figures each, 288 total)3 dragoon regiments (21 figures each, 63 total)4 light guns and limbers3 medium guns and limber2 heavy gun and limber1 assault team (3 petard teams and 2 grenadoes)1 siege engineer party (2 armed sentinels, 2 armoured eng…