Sir William Waller's Regiment of Dragoons

First of my new dragoon regiments, and my first look at the remodelled Peter Pig dragoons.

Previously, PP produced dragoons on foot, and dragoons mounted. More recently they added dragoon horseholder and horses but no command. As the mould for the dragoons on foot was being replaced Martin (Mr P.P.) mentioned he was doing so, over on RFCM, and some requests were made. Replacing one pack became several... dragoons on foot, dragoons on foot hurrying, dragoon foot command, dragoon mounted command with flag, and dragoon mounted command with drum.


My previous dragoon regiments are all on foot with horseholders, and kit bashed semi-mounted command. I like my existing dragoon command, and the overall look of my existing dragoon regiments (it's all that Streeter's fault), so I wanted to create something similar utilising the new figures.


Once again the body of fighting men (twelve) are on foot, with six horseholders each with three horse, and a command stand consisting of mounted officer, cornet and drummer. That way I have managed to use figure from four of the five new packs. Part way through painting the figures I did start to question my wisdom of unit makeup - 18 horses, 18 foot figures, a casualty figure, and 3 mounted command figures.


Lots and lots of horses and horseholders

Waller's dragoons were raised in 1643 and fought extensively throughout the First Civil War: Battle of Lansdown, Roundway Down, Siege of Basing House, Alton Church, Cheriton, Cropredy Bridge, and Second Newbury. They were disbanded in 1645.


The guidon comes from the Royalist cavalry officer Richard Symonds's annotated copy of a report by the spy, William Levett. Levett observed the muster of the London regiments at Finsbury Fields in September 1643, which is why we know so much about the standards of the London Trained Bands and auxiliaries. I have seen commercial wargaming versions of this flag for sale with the Cross of St George; I stuck with the version in English Civil War Flags & Colours Volume 3, and the one in Fahnen und Standarten.

As for coat colour, well we simply don't know. Waller had also raised a regiment of foot, who might have had yellow coats (a reference to yellow coats of Waller's army could refer to either Waller's or Potley's regiments), so it wouldn't be too much of a stretch of the imagination for the dragoons to have yellow coats too. A quick Google image search shows that many others have also taken this leap of faith, so if I'm wrong (highly likely, but prove it!) I'm  certainly not alone. Finding the 'right' yellow paint for them was really difficult. Lots of experimentation on spare figures with different washes led me to the conclusion that Coat d'Arms Golden Yellow and Foundry yellow 2B are one and the same shade of yellow. However it didn't get me any closer to my Holy Grail of yellow. Forty five minutes of perusing the yellow paint at Element Games (they have a lot of different paint ranges for sale) led to the finding of P3 Sulfuric yellow, which with a wash applied is pretty damn close to the colour I had in mind. I also discovered they sell Scalecolor paints which have some really good shades (and I previously thought were an exclusive from Greenstuff World).


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