Coat Colours Part 2: Royalist Regiments of Foot

Continuing my therapeutic blogging (write rather than rant) antidote to incorrect English Civil War coat colour tables for wargamers, I give you the Royalist Regiments of Foot


Part 1 Parliamentarian coat colours
Part 3 Scots coat colours
Part 4 Dragoons, Horse and the New Model Army coat colours
and information about the Trained Bands

Same rules apply here, as they did with the Parliamentarian coat colours: Regiments often got renamed when command passed to a new colonel - these regiments are listed under their first name e.g. Jacob Astley's Regiment was originally Richard Fielding's Regiment. Coat colour notes refer to contemporaneous references and some of the deductions made by Reid, Spring,  Peachey and Prince. You will also notice that some regiments have several coat colours listed. Where there is some question around a coat colour I have tried to give an explanation or provide notes.

There are a large number of regiments not included in this list - we don't know if they had coats issued, or in those cases where they were issued we don't have any colour recorded.


And if you are stuck wondering how to convert this information into what colours to use and what model paint colours, the links might help you start.


Sir John Ackland
Possibly grey as one of the captains changed sides to assist besieging Donnington Castle with his greycoats (National Archives SP19.158.89)


Sir Allen Apsley
Red (Symonds notebook, Aldbourne Chase Muster 19th April 1644)


Sir Arthur Aston
Uncertain possibly red, Sir Arthur (while Governor of Oxford) was often accompanied by a small guard of halberdiers dressed in red (Luke's Journal p237)


Lord Belasyse (Oxford Regt) later Sir Theophilus Gilby's
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)

Sir Thomas Blackwell


Peachey and Prince argue that they may have benefitted from the July 1643 issue of clothing (all red or all blue): they were part of the Queen’s Escort from Yorkshire to Oxford and are possibly in Oxford on the 15th July when Wood notes in his diary that “all the common soldiers then at Oxford were newly apparelled”. Charles had ridden out to meet Henrietta Maria at Edgehill on the 13th, and had returned to Oxford on the 14th, so it is safe to assume that the escorting regiments of foot would most likely arrive a day or two after the Queen. Wood’s diary ends on the 15th July so we cannot be certain if the regiments of the Queen’s Escort had arrived in the city; Peachey and Prince suppose that even if the soldiers arrived later than the 15th they would probably be issued clothing from any remaining stocks.

Col Richard Bolle later Sir George Lisle's
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103) 


Col Robert Broughton
Unclear! Returned from Ireland in 1644 and declared for the King, change of Col from William Cromwell to Robert Broughton. When returned were described as wearing green coats (evidence unclear), fought at Marston Moor where a brigade of green coats was described.  Implying more than one regiment, that could be Broughton's and Tillier's.


Col Brutus Buck
A tenuous blue - Buck's went on to form Hopton's who we know wore blue. It has been suggested that they must have worn blue as Buck's


Col Anthony Byerly
Stuart Reid argues that they could be a contender for the white coats with blue and red silk crosses on their sleeves captured at York 


Earl of Carbery (Wales)
Parliamentarians captured 100 new red coats at Haverfordwest in 1644, possibly belonging to Carbery's regiment



Col Francis Cooke
Deduced to be white by Peachey and Prince but not definite


Sir Conyers Darcy later Col Marmaduke Darcy’s
Blue (Stratologia by Andrew Cooper 1660)


Sir Ralph Dutton later Sir Stephen Hawkins
White coats Sept 1644, may have been clad in either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in Jul 1643 along with the other Royalist foot regiments then in Oxford (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)


Sir Lewis Dyve
Deduced to be white by Peachey and Prince but not definite

Col William Eure


Possibly all red or all blue (see Blackwell's for explanation)

Col Richard Fielding later, Jacob, Lord Astley’s
Clad in either all red or all blue (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103) suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in Jul 1643 along with the other Royalist foot regiments then in Oxford. Sept 1644 they received another issue, but of unknown colour. 1644 they are mentioned with Pennyman's as the white and grey regiments


Sir Edward Fitton later Col Anthony Thelwall's
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119)


Lord General
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)


Sir Charles Gerard possibly later Col Francis Windebank’s
Blue (Symonds notebook 13th February 1644)


Sir Gilbert Gerard later Col Radcliffe Gerard's
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)


Col Richard Herbert
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)


Marquis of Hertford Later Sir Bernard Astley's
Deduced to be white by Peachey and Prince but not definite


Lord Hopton
Blue (Symonds notebook, Aldbourne Chase Muster 19th April 1644)


Lord Inchiquin
Wore red coats at Cheriton (Thamason Tracts E40(20))


The King’s Lifeguard
Wore all red suits of coats, breeches and monteros; the King thanked Thomas Bushall for the clothing (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103; Symonds notebook 13th February 1644 )


Sir William Lambton
Probably white coats: sometimes called the 'lambs', however it is possible lamb refers to Lambton, or his family coat of arms which features lambs, rather than  colour of his regiment's coats.


Colonel John Lamplugh
White Peachey and Prince believed Lamplugh's to be one of the white coated regiments at Marston Moor.


Lord Molyneux
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)


Marquis of Newcastle
White (Thamason Tracts E2), see also note on Conyer's Regiment re: Newcastle's lifeguard 


Earl of Northampton
Oft cited as Green but questionable. A Royalist was captured at the battle of Southam because he mistook John Hampden's men for the Earl of Northampton's, supposedly because of similar (green) uniforms . However this seems unlikely as Hampden's had not received their coats at this date 


Sir John Owen (Oxford)
Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)


Sir William Pennyman later Sir James Pennyman's, then Sir Richard Page's
Clad in either all red or all blue (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103) suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in Jul 1643 along with the other Royalist foot regiments then in Oxford. Sept 1644 they received another issue, but of unknown colour. 1644 they are mentioned with Fielding's as the white and grey regiments


Lord Percy later Col William Murray's

White (Symonds notebook 13th February 1644 )

Col Thomas Pinchbeck later Sir Henry Bard’s

Grey (Symonds notebook 13th February 1644 )
The Queen’s Lifeguard

Prince Rupert's


Red (Symonds notebook 13th February 1644 )

Blue (Shrewsbury Borough Records billeting document 1643; Thamason Tracts E 6/23)
Prince Rupert’s Lifeguard


Wore red coats at the storm of Leicester (Officers and Regiments of the Kings Army Vol 2 L-Z, S Reid)

Sir Barnaby Scudamore




Possibly red there is a reference to Herefordshire folklore tales featuring Scudamore’s troops as ‘the red men of the dusk’ 
Sir Nicholas Slanning later Sir Thomas Bassett's



Possibly blue - Slanning owned a dye works in Taunton, and its often been supposed that blue was a likely colour for Cornish coats, but there's no real explicit evidence.

Sir Edward Stradling later Col John Stradling's, then Col Thomas Stradling's


Either all red or all blue suits of coats, breeches and montero hats in July 1643 (Luke's Journal p119; Wood's diary p103)
Col John Talbot (Irish) later Sir Gilbert Talbot’s

Yellow (Symonds notebook, Aldbourne Chase Muster 19th April 1644)

Sergeant-Major-General Henry Tillier

Green (Symonds diary p75; Thamason Tracts E6(23))
Sir Thomas Tyldesley


Red (likely) (Lancashire Royalist Composition Papers 337)
Sir Charles Vavasour later Sir Matthew Appleyard

Yellow (Ludlow's Memoirs p72) 
Prince of Wales (Welsh Marches)


Blue (Shrewsbury billeting records)
Col Henry Warren








Fanshaw lists red when they served in Ireland as the Lord Lieutenant's Regiment in 1640 (quoted in An English Army for Ireland, I Ryder). On arrival in Chester, November 1643, their clothing was so bad that the Mayor of Chester "sent through all the wards to get apparel of the citizens" (A Collection of Original Letters and Papers, Carte London 1739 Vol5) to clothe the troops returned from Ireland, prior to a clothing issue arriving for them.

King’s Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard


Red The Yeomen wore, as they still do, a scarlet uniform of the Tudor style
Duke of York
Deduced to be white by Peachey and Prince but not definite



Comments

  1. Replies
    1. Thanks Codsticker. Fallen down a bit of a rabbit hole at the moment looking at coat colours and Trained Bands. Expect couple more coat colours posts and a wider Trained Band post over the next couple of weeks.

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    2. I haven't looked into the Trained Bands much; probably because I associate them with Parliament and I am concentrating Royalists. Still, I really look forward to what you discover.

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    3. Some interesting stuff on the Trained Bands, mostly an excuse for me to debunk the myth of the London Trained Bands wore red coats'.

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    4. Quite a few TB fought for the King, some fought for both King and Parliament at different times, others... different companies fought on different sides. Sums up the chaos of the time.

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    5. Very interesting. Were the TB's that fought for Charles mostly used as garrison troops?

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    6. Most of the Trained Bands seem to have operated as garrison troops, regardless of which side they supported. When you look at Trained Band involvement in 'battles' mostly the Trained Bands haven't travelled too far. Of course there are exceptions - the LTB, Kent, Essex (who ventured to Scotland in the First Bishop's War), who mostly fought for Parliament.

      The famous Trained Band Regiments who fought for the King were City of Bristol (sometimes called Taylor's), the Oxfordshire Trained Bands, many of the Yorkshire TBs (others fought for Parliament) and the Durham TB.

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