Lord Robartes's Regiment of Foot

Yet another briefly mentioned Regiment gets it's moment in the spotlight. This time Lord Robartes's Regiment of Foot.

John Robartes was the 1st Earl of Radnor, the Viscount Bodmin. He bought his barony in 1620 for £10,000 in 1625 - there are contemporary rumours that he was compelled to buy it.


He raised a regiment in 1642 and fought with 'valour' at Edgehill, the regiment fought at Brentford, were present at Turnham Green, the siege of Reading, a skirmish at Stow, the relief of Gloucester, First Newbury, Olney and ventured into Cornwall with Essex in 1644. There they fought at Barnstaple, Warminster, Horsebridge and Lostwithiel before taking up garrison duties at Saltash.

Their last engagement as Lord Robartes's was the defence of Abingdon before they were reduced into the New Model Army in April 1645 (companies of the regiment joined Ingoldsby's and Lloyd's Regiments of Foot).


Lord Robartes was made governor of Plymouth but lost his job with the Self-Denying Ordinance, and returned to his home at Lanhydrock. He would return to public office with the Restoration and amongst other posts was Lord Privy Seal. He died in July 1685 and is buried at St Hydrock's Church.


Sadly the home he built and completed just before the outbreak of the Civil War was destroyed in the nineteenth century by fire, so few artefacts relating to him survive.

The Regiment is re-enacted by Lord Robartes Regiment of Foote

Brushwork on these by Alan Tuckey, basing by my own fair hand.

As a complete aside - this is my 200th post! A celebratory schooner of sweet sherry is in order.

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