Sir George Vaughan’s Regiment of Horse

What's this? More Horse? I hear my regular readers exclaim (hello all eight of you). I know I said that there would be no more Horse, but a reorganisation of 'the boxes' threw up some emptiness; fearful that such expanses of box wasteland would cause cataclysmic chaos theory consequences, I thought I'd better fill it. So one more Horse a side it is.

So here, for your delectation, is Sir George Vaughan’s Regiment of Horse. Raised in Wiltshire.

They fought at Lansdown; were probably at Roundway Down; stormed Bristol; the siege of Gloucester; First Newbury; possibly at the siege of Wardour Castle; were able to field two troops at Cheriton; Cropredy Bridge; Lostwithiel; Caradon Down; Second Newbury; before rounding the First Civil War off (and their existence) at the relief of Donnington Castle.

Vaughan, himself, was wounded at Lansdown. he was captured at Hereford in 1645. As a result, he would be imprisoned at Southwark, and fined £2,609 for his "delinquency". 

Sir George was the second son of Sir Walter Vaughan MP for Wiltshire. Sir George inherited his father's estate on account of his elder brother died before Sir Walter. 

The estate at Falstone was sequestered in 1645 and subsequently garrisoned by Parliamentary forces. It became the county base for the assessors of composition fines on Royalists’ personal property, whose compiled notebooks were known as the Falstone Day Book. In October 1649 the house was razed on orders from Parliament. Soon afterwards Sir George, having moved to Court Farm in Pembrey,  Carmarthenshire, sold the site to the 4th Earl of Pembroke. Sir George died without issue not long after.

These are all straight out of the bag PP figures. I must confess that my Royalist Horse are becoming very sword heavy as I really dislike the new one piece castings (pistol in hat); leaving aside my preference for painting two part cavalry, they are so very flat in comparison to the older two piece casts (the horses are fine, the riders are very narrow).

And in case you were wondering what 336 Royalist horsemen looked like...



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Comments

  1. Another cracking looking unit of horse. 👍 Very important to keep those boxes looking tidy!

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  2. Interesting as ever. I don't know whether you intend including Court Farm in a future 'sites of interest.' By chance I used to live in Pembrey and stumbled across the much neglected Court Farm by accident. There is no official public access but it's viewable from the roadside. Odd to see it mentioned today in a completely different context!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Dex. Strangely my Travelogue to visit list hasn't really looked at Wales yet. No idea why. No logic to it whatsoever

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