Colonel Patrick Graham of Inchbrackie’s Atholl Highlanders

Colonel Patrick Graham of Inchbrackie was a cousin of the Marquis of Montrose, and was known as Black Pate because he had been facially disfigured in a gunpowder explosion. 

Inchbrackie was an ardent supporter of Montrose and Charles I, and raised a small regiment of Highlanders from the Atholl area -  the regiment were also known as the Perthshire Levies. 


The regiment was raised  from the Atholl estates and were in the main Stewarts, Robertsons, Camerons and Murrays. 

One of these men, Alexander Robertson was later given a pension by Charles II in recognition of his services. The Robertsons carried a standard at the point of which was a small stone known as the Clan-Nan-Brattich that apparently made them invincible in battle. 


They fielded 500 men at Tippermuir, were present at Fyvie, fielding 500 men again this time at Inverlochy, fought at Auldearn, possibly fought at Alford, fielded 200 men at Kilsyth, then besieged Inverness. They finished off  by routing Campbell of Ardkinglas at Callendar.

After all I have learned about feileadh mòr, and the cost of fabric in Scotland in the seventeenth century I did try plain cloth on my highlander levvies, interspersed with a few tartan clad men. Just didn't look right. So full tartan it is, even if it is historically accurate (seeing as I mention historical accuracy, don't look too closely as there are a handful of men wearing the fèileadh beag, or small kilt, which didn't come into existence for over another hundred years or so). 

So here they are, my first highland regiment: which saw much cursing and gnashing of teeth during a very steep learning curve at representing 'tartan'. In a nutshell there are no easy or quick ways - bite the bullet and paint that tartan. I think it might be possible to spot some of my earlier attempts; towards the end I felt much more confident having a go at tartan.


A straight out of the bag unit, including the new highlanders with muskets pack. No headswaps here, although they do field a standing casualty, and a lowland officer amongst their number.

Only another 125 highlanders to go...


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Comments

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you for your kind words. They'll do at arm's length if I take my glasses off.

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