Cromwell (1970)

I do like a good period film on in the background when painting (painting French line whilst Waterloo is on in the background is the only way to make it pleasurable). This is good fodder to 'set the scene' whilst you stick your tongue out when concentrating on fiddly detail.  Richard Harris and Alec Guiness play Oliver and Charles respectively.

Just don't use it as painting inspiration, unless you want to perpetuate the myth of ironsides wearing rugby shirts.


Yes, it's all wrong. Why should anything like facts get in the way of a film script? If historical inaccuracies really offend you, then this film is not for you.

The film makers advertised their film as the result of extensive historical research... whoever the researcher was, I don't think they were researching the right Cromwell. I can understand and forgive poetic licence in order to provide a cinematic experience, to move a story along; but this film takes 'use of poetic licence' to the extreme.

It's a film, it is entertainment. It does have the right 'feel' about it, plus it has massed battles with masses of real people not CGI.

Despite the fact that the film is nonsense, I actually really like it.

Someone has reviewed the film on YouTube and pointed out every factual error and also what they got right.  Part one and part two


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